Posts Tagged ‘Grace’

Four Seasons Lighting Lab Project

Fall Sunset in Hawaii

I chose this picture as an example of a Fall Hawaiian sunset because of the warm colors accented by the tall dark palm tree.  I could feel the warmth of the Hawaiian sun, and felt the colors of the sunset melded together nicely in a way that would make for a nice lighting moment.

MODEL:

-AP8350 75%

*37 degree elevation angle

*12 ft. SR of model

*Direct sidelight to model

-AP7450 75%

*27 degree elevation angle

*12 ft. SR of model

*Direct sidelight to model

-AP8350 FULL

*0 degree elevation angle

*12 ft. SR of model

*Direct sidelight to model

-AP7450 25%

*37 degree elevation angle

*12 ft. SL of model

*Direct sidelight to model

-No Gel Color

*54 degree elevation angle

*Direct back light centered on model

*8 ft. DS of model

BACKDROP:

-Top: G345 90%, G250 FULL, G390 0%, G250 FULL

-Bottom: AP7450 25%, G382 FULL, AP8350 70%, AP7330 10%

Spring Sunrise on Long Island

I chose this picture as my Long Island sunrise inspiration because the blush and rose colored beams peaking over the horizon remind me of cherry blossoms in bloom during springtime.  The colors also complemented each other nicely through their soft, pastel tones.

MODEL:

-AP4720 50%

*37 degree elevation angle

*12 ft. SR of model

*Direct sidelight to model

-G410 50%

*27 degree elevation angle

*12 ft. SR of model

*Direct sidelight to model

-G250 FULL

*0 degree elevation angle

*12 ft. SR of model

*Direct sidelight to model

-No Color, 60%

*54 degree elevation angle

*Direct back light centered on model

*8 ft. DS of model

-AP6400, FULL

*52 degree elevation angle

*21 degree back angle

*3 ft. SL of model

*8 ft. US of model

-AP7450, 0%

*37 degree elevation angle

*12 ft. SL of model

*Direct sidelight to model

BACKDROP:

-Top: Blue 90%, AP4300 FULL, AP4100 FULL, Blue FULL

-Bottom: G325 75%, G388 10%, G323 25%, AP8840 0%

Summertime Noon in New England

I chose this photo because I think of green grass and nature when I think of New England.  The vibrant colors of the grass, trees and puffy cloud-filled sky felt fresh and relaxing, just like summertime.

MODEL:

-No Color, 50%

*37 degree elevation angle

*56 degree side angle

*12 ft. SR of model

*8 ft. DS of model

-AP4720 FULL

*0 degree elevation angle

*12 ft. SR of model

*Direct sidelight to model

-G740, 50%

*-23 degree elevation angle

*12 ft. SR of model

*Direct sidelight to model

-G390 FULL

*54 degree elevation angle

*Direct backlight entered on model

*8 ft. DS of model

-No Color, 50%

*42 degree elevation angle

*48 degree side angle

*9 ft. SL of model

*8 ft. DS of model

BACKDROP:

-Top: AP4300 FULL, G850 25%, G855 50%, AP3540 50%

-Bottom: G870 50%, GHT254 75%, AP410050%, G83525%

Winter Afternoon in Alaska

I chose this photo because I felt it reflected two major parts of Alaska: fishing and snow.  I really love the way the sun contours and reflects off of the snow covered mountains, and used that angle of light as inspiration for my lighting.

MODEL:

-No Color FULL

*54 degree elevation angle

*Direct back light centered on model

*8 ft. DS of model

-G870 FULL

*43 degree elevation angle

*12 ft. SL of model

*Direct sidelight to model

-G810 50%

*27 degree elevation angle

*12 ft. SL of model

*Direct sidelight to model

BACKDROP:

-Top: G810 25%, G810 50%, G810 25%, G810 50%

-Bottom: G810 FULL, G785 FULL, G810 FULL, L174 75%

Light Observation

  1. Thursday, April 13th, 8:12pm; NAB Black Box Theatre
  2. Looking up to see all of the work lights above the grid on.
  3. While sitting at rehearsal for the Dance Concert, I happened to look up and notice the Black Box in way that I never had before: all of the work lights were on, and it created a jungle-like effect.  Jungle-like in the way that vines hang in the jungle; the beam spreads of all of the different scoops and cans and florescents crossed and intertwined with each other – it looked messy, but it was messy in a pleasing and satisfying way.  It made me realize that there is art in not only the actual lighting of a space, but there is also art simply within the instruments as well, if you look close enough.

Photo Observation

  1. Photo found online at JuneauEmpire.com
  2. Theme: Summer!!
  3. When I found out the theme was summer for this week’s photo observation, I immediately thought of the cliche beach view – sublime, serene, and the carrot at the end of the stick of a long semester.  Just looking at this picture I can feel the warmth of the sun on my skin, smell the beautiful Yankee Candle smell of sand and salt, and hear the calming whoosh of the waves.  However, if the sun is not hanging in just the right way in the sky, it could ruin an well-intentioned beach day.  The lighting in this picture encapsulates a truly ideal summer day – the sun highlights and accentuates the bright, pure colors of the water, sand, and umbrella.

Lighting Observation

  1. Thursday, April 6th, 2017; 2:45pm; Inside the Financial Aid Office Building, South Campus
  2. A dreary day juxtaposed with a brightly lit, white overcast sky.
  3. Since April brings showers, I thought it would be fitting to start April’s first lighting observation with one involving rain.  It fits perfectly with this week’s theme as well, as the light created an almost unreal landscape.  Waiting upstairs in financial aid, I happened to glance out the window to see the campus with a rather dreary disposition; the trees seemed to hang a little lower, and everything seemed to be a bit grayer.  With the rain, it painted the picture of another drab April shower.  But as I looked up, I noticed that the sky provided an interestingly stark contrast to what was down below.  Despite an overcast sky full a clouds, the sun was putting up a valiant fight to make its presence known, and it was succeeding – its bright, indistinct wash created a contrast that made me stare a few seconds longer, intrigued.

Photo Observation

  1.  Found on Izismile.com, photo manipulation by Sarolta Ban; http://izismile.com/2010/07/13/beautiful_surreal_photomanipulations_32_pics.html
  2.  Theme: Surreal
  3.  I found this picture to be fitting for the theme because, much like the definition of the word ‘surreal’, it is a very unnatural photograph.  More importantly though, the lighting used to create the image really sold the surreal aspect of the picture; had the tree been front-lit, I think it would have produced a more serene and happy image.  However, because of the way the lighting casts shadows and darkness onto the water, and the way the tree and the boat are highlighted through the backlight, it gives a truly unique feeling that the image and situation is absurd; it gives the feeling that something is definitely off, but in a captivating and almost mesmerizing way.

Photo Observation

  1. Found on Flickr, taken by Alexander Rabb; https://www.flickr.com/photos/rt48state/6886088584
  2. There is nothing spookier than standing at a station waiting for the subway and watching as an empty car stops right in front of you, because you know that it’s never for a good reason and you definitely don’t want to get in it.  The angle of the picture, along with the lighting, help to enhance that effect.  The natural perspective of the image, the fluorescent lights, and the mute colors of the seat all heighten that abandoned feeling the car has.  In a place that is usually always busy and full of people, an empty subway car feels out of place and has an especially eerie feeling.

Light Observation

  1. Tuesday, March 28th; 8:06pm; Dorm room on 13th floor, window facing Hempstead Turnpike
  2. The infamous Hofstra birds circling in the low-hanging fog with the streetlamps creating an orange haze within.
  3. Every night without fail on the North side of campus, a flock of at least 30 birds circle, swoop, and dive within the sky, making my bedroom feel like part of a Hitchcock movie.  Tuesday night was especially Hitchcock-esque though with the fog; the gray fog was so thick it was opaque, and it made it even creepier when the birds would seem to appear out of thin air and then dive back into the fog.  The only thing able to break through the fog were the streetlights dotting Hempstead Turnpike and the side streets within Hempstead.  It lit up the city in a way unique to anything I had seen any other night.  Despite their spread being out of focus, the orange light coming from the lamps was the clearest thing in the night, like a beacon.  I don’t think Hitchcock could have created a better picture himself.

Photo Observation

  1. Photo found online through Google, taken from Brigham Young University – Idaho webpage, photographer unknown; https://courses.byui.edu/art110_new/art110/glossary/glossary.html
  2.  Theme: Single Object/Single Light Source
  3. At first I found this theme to be more daunting than the rest; how was I going to figure out if a photo had a single light source?  This picture however really struck me, and I feel it fits the theme well for a couple of reasons.  First, it clearly shows where the light source is – it is a SR diagonal front light; we can tell by the way the shadows and light itself falls within the picture, the second reason this picture works well.  Through the positioning of the object, we are able to see not only where the light source is in relation to the object, but what type of angle the light source is at. My guess is that the light source is at a steeper angle because of how the shadow falls more on the bottom corner of the object while the top portion has more beam coverage, and that is is closer to being a side light than it is to being a straight front because of where the beam spread falls.

Light Observation

  1. Tuesday, March 14th, 7:45 pm; Bill of Rights Hall 12th Floor Kitchen
  2. The stadium lights reflecting off of the field hockey field’s snow.
  3. While enjoying a much wanted snow day with friends, I saw out the large wall-length window in the kitchen what I thought to be a freshly laid ice rink.  Excited, I asked my friend about Hofstra’s new winter wonderland addition, only to notice upon closer look through the window it was actually just the stadium lights reflecting off of the snow to give it a sheer, glossy appearance.  I found it very cool (no pun intended) that the light was able to take one texture and make it appear to be something different, and it made me wonder how often lighting designers do that onstage with different materials and fabrics.

Lighting Observation

  1. Tuesday, March 7th, 5:48pm; NAB Black Box.
  2. The ghost light in the pitch black theatre casting shadows over the Dram 005 chair scheme.
  3. I had been looking for a lighting moment all week; everywhere I turned I would turn look at the sky, or watch the shadows dance across the building, and while there were some good candidates, none of the lighting I observed struck a chord.  I was certain however that sitting for 3 1/2 hours backstage during Hamlet every night, some type of cool light beam would peak out from under a doorway, or a can would cast a laid back and notable image, but alas, none were to be found.  It was while walking into the Black Box to retrieve my scarf I had left there the other day when it smacked me in the face: the perfect lighting moment.  Ironically, it was the type of lighting moment I had been hoping to elicit from the Playhouse.  The ghost light emitted a warm yellowish/orange glow that cast a gorgeous shadow over the plush blue seats in the theater.  The shadows from the chairs created a gobo effect on the floor, looking like jail cell bars.  It caught me so off guard by its perfection – the same way, I’m sure, a bride feels when finding that perfect white dress. I snapped a quick photo and smiled to myself, thinking about how the perfect lighting moment I had been searching for came when I wasn’t searching at all.  Deep.