Posts Tagged ‘single light source’

Photo Observation

  1. Marilyn Monroe, Photographed by Sam Shaw, Seven Year Itch
  2. Single Subject – Single Light Source
  3. When i learned that the theme was single subject – single light source, i immediately thought of this photograph of Marilyn Monroe. I love how she is sitting in a very elaborate costume backstage beneath a stage light just sipping a cup of coffee. It is the perfect set up of a picture and captures such a simple moment.

Photo Observation

  1. This photo was taken by a photographer friend of mine
  2. Theme: Single Subject/ Single Light Source
  3. I really live how he uses light in photos. This one is particular is so simple, yet i get chills every time i look at it. You can see her face clearly and it looks so intense.

Photo Observation

  1. Photo found online through Google, taken from Brigham Young University – Idaho webpage, photographer unknown; https://courses.byui.edu/art110_new/art110/glossary/glossary.html
  2.  Theme: Single Object/Single Light Source
  3. At first I found this theme to be more daunting than the rest; how was I going to figure out if a photo had a single light source?  This picture however really struck me, and I feel it fits the theme well for a couple of reasons.  First, it clearly shows where the light source is – it is a SR diagonal front light; we can tell by the way the shadows and light itself falls within the picture, the second reason this picture works well.  Through the positioning of the object, we are able to see not only where the light source is in relation to the object, but what type of angle the light source is at. My guess is that the light source is at a steeper angle because of how the shadow falls more on the bottom corner of the object while the top portion has more beam coverage, and that is is closer to being a side light than it is to being a straight front because of where the beam spread falls.

One Source of Light

 

 

Source: http://dreamscapist.tumblr.com/image/36707816435

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I like the way the light in this photo is able to accentuate the shape of a person and still tell us nothing about him. The photo leads me to believe this person is dark, brooding and maybe even dangerous. Part of that may come from the black hoodie, but I think it’s mostly because not much is illuminated here and the sense of mystery the shadows creates automatically brings my mind to a dark place.

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Photo Observation

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I like this picture because the warm light coming in through the window of the house is very comforting. It reminds me of a picture i took of my house this past summer. The single light source of the window gives the feeling of a calm afternoon in a welcoming house.

Single Light Source: What is he hiding?

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I chose this picture because it reminded me of the lecture on Stanley McCandless. He said that to make stage lighting look natural, one side of the actor’s face will have to be lit with warm light and the other with cooler light, because one is rarely looking straight-on into a lighting source. Here we see a man, the left side of his face illuminated, and the right side in almost total darkness. His left eye looks so warm and available, the wrinkle around his mouth looks like the shadow of a smile. But he is not looking at us head-on, and only a small catch-light from his pupil is visible in his right eye — the lighting and the subtly turned head gives the impression that he has a secret. I wonder what he is hiding?

http://www.jeffmaddenphotography.com/People/Headshots/i-kdChZjR/0/L/Dave-Parrish-Headshot-L.jpg

Photo Observation 2 Single Light Source/Shadow

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Taken 2/7/12

single light source/shadow

I found this photo interesting because the shadow made a cool effect through the case. the shadow for the clear case made alost an optical illusion and gave a clear object a shadow. also since the shadow was casted on to a wall and the light souce was so close it made the shadow appear much larger then the object it came from witch I also found cool.

 

Photo Observation #2: Single Light Source/Shadows

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Photo from taheny.com/2006/09/summer-rain-and-candles.htm

Theme: Single Light Source/Shadows

This picture really jumped out at me because the lighting is similar to that of a sunrise, which was our assignment last week. The most intense source of the light is in the center of the picture. It instills a sense of life and soul in the picture for me. When I look at how the light is strong in the center and fills the room slowly dimming at it’s edges, I get a strong sense of strength and presence in the room. It’s an intense spotlight. The strength of the white light, which fades from red to orange and yellow says I am here. I am present and I am strong. I am not going anywhere. At first you assume the light to be isolated because it is only one source. On the contrary, the light from the burning candle, though alone, is extremely strong and doesn’t simply remain as one small flame of light, a single source. The light completely fills the entire room as if it were just as strong as a variety of different light sources.

Photo Observation Week #2: Single Light Source/Shadows

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2. Photo of myself, taken by Laurel Chausse in 2011.

3. Theme: Single Light Source/Shadows

4. The day before this photo was taken, I was watching a modeling show in which the models had to light themselves holding two large lamps. It didn’t seem too hard a task, but the models were struggling. It soon became clear why it was so difficult. Holding the light below my face creates a strange, non-human look. The bridge of my nose is completely in shadow, making it look as though it belongs to a shorter-nosed animal, like a cat. My cheekbones cast shadows to the sides of my eyes, which create a slightly creepy triangular eye effect, like the facemasks robbers use in the movies. My forehead is completely dark, giving the impression that I have a non-existent forehead, or at least bangs. Overall, the shadows create a mysterious, intense effect, and morph my face into something it is not. It is clear how powerfully light affects our perceptions of shapes. Faces, which seem common and unchanging, can be totally distorted by a single light.